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How I fixed Windows event id 333 (disabling NFS)

As much as I like to delve in cutting edge tech, to make a living I also provide systems administration services on old-school environments, where ahem Windows rules.

One problem that's been biting me (daily!) for some time now is that on a Win2k3 Storage Server Event ID 333 will often surface, requiring a reboot.

After checking all software, disabling antivirus, analyzing memory pools and all the usual (and unusual) stuff it turned out that the cause of the problem was the NFS server. I moved all shares to an EMC NAS, modified mount points, disabled the NFS service and the issue has been gone for the last two weeks.

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