Skip to main content

Installing Sproutcore on Windows (with Screenshots)

Most Sproutcore developers working on Windows are used to the installer, which is also the default choice on the download page.

Since lately the installer seems to be a little unreliable I decided to try the manual way and screenshot the whole process so that it might be of help to others.

The first thing to do is install Ruby for Windows, which can be conveniently fetched from http://rubyinstaller.org/. I recommend you pick version 1.9.2 which, at the moment, I believe is the version used by most of the Sproutcore developers.

Installing is a breeze, just remember to tick the 'Add Ruby to your path' box so that you don't have to do it yourself later. If you have other ruby versions installed and you DO care about which version is selected by default than it's up to you whether or not to tick the box.

If unsure just tick the box.

When the installer is done open a command prompt (just type cmd in the run box on the Start menu and select the black icon on top of the list). In the command prompt type:

gem install sproutcore

and wait for the whole process to end. The full output is shown in the image on the right. Sproutcore is now installed and you can head to the guides to start using it right away!

The first time you start sc-server Windows Firewall might ask you to allow the ruby process to open a network port on your computer, just say yes or you won't be able to use the live preview of your apps.

If you're worried about security remember that Sproutcore 1.8 and higher only allows connections from localhost by default, so it's pretty tight.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Indexing Apache access logs with ELK (Elasticsearch+Logstash+Kibana)

Who said that grepping Apache logs has to be boring?

The truth is that, as Enteprise applications move to the browser too, Apache access logs are a gold mine, it does not matter what your role is: developer, support or sysadmin. If you are not mining them you are most likely missing out a ton of information and, probably, making the wrong decisions.
ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) is a terrific, Open Source stack for visually analyzing Apache (or nginx) logs (but also any other timestamped data).

From 0 to ZFS replication in 5m with syncoid

The ZFS filesystem has many features that once you try them you can never go back. One of the lesser known is probably the support for replicating a zfs filesystem by sending the changes over the network with zfs send/receive.
Technically the filesystem changes don't even need to be sent over a network: you could as well dump them on a removable disk, then receive  from the same removable disk.

RUNDECK job maintenance

Learn more about Rundeck.

Now that I have a fair number of jobs scheduled by Rundeck, how do I periodically prune the job execution history and keep only the last, say, 30 executions for each job?