Skip to main content

Salt Diaries: installing on SLES (episode 3)

Welcome to the third episode of the series! In the previous posts we have installed salt on CentOS machines and then moved on with a basic state configuration (we will cover more in the coming postst).

Now it's time to handle those pesky SLES hosts for which there are no pre built binaries. Therefore we'll have to install salt using pip.
I'll cover SLES11 in this post as that's the only variant I have. Hopefully other versions should require only minor changes.

Note: active subscription to Novell update service is required as the following packages can only be found on SLES 11 SDK (it's an iso, and a large one, so if you don't have it around start downloading it before you start): python-devel libopenssl-devel zlib-devel swig

Installation

Add the SDK iso in the Software Management sources. Then, as root, run the following commands (answer yes when required):

zypper in gcc-c++ python-devel libopenssl-devel zlib-devel swig
zypper -p http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/fengshuo:/zeromq/SLE_11_SP1/ -v in zeromq
curl http://python-distribute.org/distribute_setup.py | python
curl https://raw.github.com/pypa/pip/master/contrib/get-pip.py | python
pip install -U salt

Running salt-minion

Salt programs (salt-minion, salt, salt-key, etc) should now be installed. Since pip does not provide init scripts or configuration files, we'll have to handle that ourselves. For the configuration file there are lots of options: it can be copied from other minions, can be totally dispensed with (if your salt master is resolvable as salt) o can be as minimalistic as:

log_file: /var/log/salt/minion
master: your-master-hostname


In my case I went for the minimalistic option and created the minion file with just the lines above in /etc/salt.
To have salt-minion start and stop as a service I copied the /etc/init.d/skeleton template in /etc/init.d/salt-minion and customized it.
The edited version is available in this gist (remember to chmod it if you copy it from the gist).

The service can then be activated with:
chkconfig salt-minion on

Reboot and enjoy.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Indexing Apache access logs with ELK (Elasticsearch+Logstash+Kibana)

Who said that grepping Apache logs has to be boring?

The truth is that, as Enteprise applications move to the browser too, Apache access logs are a gold mine, it does not matter what your role is: developer, support or sysadmin. If you are not mining them you are most likely missing out a ton of information and, probably, making the wrong decisions.
ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) is a terrific, Open Source stack for visually analyzing Apache (or nginx) logs (but also any other timestamped data).

From 0 to ZFS replication in 5m with syncoid

The ZFS filesystem has many features that once you try them you can never go back. One of the lesser known is probably the support for replicating a zfs filesystem by sending the changes over the network with zfs send/receive.
Technically the filesystem changes don't even need to be sent over a network: you could as well dump them on a removable disk, then receive  from the same removable disk.

Mirth: recover space when mirthdb grows out of control

I was recently asked to recover a mirth instance whose embedded database had grown to fill all available space so this is just a note-to-self kind of post.
Btw: the recovery, depending on db size and disk speed, is going to take long.

The problem A 1.8 Mirth Connect instance was started, then forgotten (well neglected, actually). The user also forgot to setup pruning so the messages filled the embedded Derby database until it grew to fill all the available space on the disk. The SO is linux.

The solution First of all: free some disk space so that the database can be started in embedded mode from the cli. You can also copy the whole mirth install to another server if you cannot free space. Depending on db size you will need a corresponding amount of space: in my case a 5GB db required around 2GB to start, process logs and then store the temp files during shrinking.

Then open a shell as the user that mirth runs as (you're not running it as root, are you?) and cd into the mirth home. …